Words of Wisdom: Women, Beware the Beauty Beyond the Buttons and Bows

All gussied up but not happy. Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Words of Wisdom: Women, Beware the Beauty Beyond the Buttons and Bows

Moreover, the Lord says: Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched forth necks and wanton (seductive) eyes, prancing and mincing about as they go, tinkling their ankle bracelets. Therefore the Lord will afflict the scalps of the daughters of Zion with a scab, and the Lord will lay bare their secret parts. In that day the Lord will strip away the bravery of tinkling ornaments, cauls*, crescents, chains, bracelets, and mufflers (veils), headdresses, leg ornaments, sashes, perfume boxes, amulets, signet rings, nose jewels, festive apparel, mantels (shawls), wimples (head and neck coverings), crisping pins (purses), hand glasses (mirrors), fine linen, hoods, and veils. It shall come to pass, instead of fragrant smells there will be putridness; instead of a girdle, a rent (torn cloth); instead of well-styled hair, baldness; instead of fine stomacher (decorative underclothing), sackcloth; branding (burn mark) instead of beauty. Your men will fall by the sword, your strength (might) in warfare. Then her gates will lament and mourn; desolate, she will sit on the ground. In that day seven women will take hold of one man, saying, “We will eat our own bread and wear our own apparel, only let us be called by your name. Take away our reproach.” Isaiah 3:16-4:1

The Bible focuses so heavily upon man that sometimes women appear mostly neglected, mere innocent bystanders, except whenever women get portrayed as convenient scapegoats for the missteps of men. However, some significant passages warn women of their unique godly responsibilities. Isaiah offers one of those passages which also reveals the reasoning behind the attitude and attire of nuns in the Catholic Church. The passage contrasts the worldly view of women versus God’s ideal for women.

This passage provides a timely relevant message for all young women to ponder. And here are a few questions for the young ladies reading this passage: First, do you feel God made a mistake when he created you? Do you believe all those buttons and bows make you more attractive and appealing than you are? Do you think God prefers you all decked out and gussied up, rather than the way he created you? Why do you invest so much time creating an image that is not the natural you? Do you only feel beautiful by adorning and gussying yourself?

I believe this passage reveals that all the rogue, eyeliner, blush, and fuss fixing your hair does nothing for the condition of a young lady’s heart and soul. Of course, one’s vanity smiles and sashays when you adorn yourself just to draw attention. And, for what purposes? Is all your effort meant to appease Go, man, or self? From which of these can anyone gain lasting peace and security in life?

Since the earliest days, we know for a fact that women of ancient Egyptian and Sumerian cultures began to adorn themselves with jewelry, bangles, and fine apparel, and even paint their faces. Many millennia later, women in almost every culture continue this practice, so maybe history argues that God intended women to go through all the fuss of wearing fancy buttons and bows to attract the man of their desires. But, is that what God says is the most important thing a woman should place her focus?

If a woman’s vanity is focused upon her outer beauty to capture the hearts of men, has she abandoned her most significant relationship with God, her Creator? Will the man of her desires only see her for the contrived, temporal outer image, and then become disillusioned by what he discovers beneath the facade? Rather than trying to appeal to natural, sinful man, why not seek to be desirous according to God’s will, ways, and wisdom?

Remember, at the end of the day, long after you have captured the heart of any man, you must eventually remove the buttons and bows and wash your face. Will he still see your genuine, natural beauty that God gifted you? What kind of glamour will hold fast the relationship God intended between a man and a woman? God brings a man and woman together through the mutual desire of their hearts and souls uniting them as one, not all the fancy buttons and bows.

Coach
www.coachbrown.org

*caul (cowl) – (literally, helmeted head) is a piece of membrane that can cover a newborn’s head and face. Though rare and harmless, it is removed by the doctor or midwife upon delivery of the child. There are various types of cauls from a thin film to more of a cocoon-like covering of an infant.

In medieval times a caul on a newborn was an omen that the child was destined for greatness. The midwife would rub a sheet of paper across the baby’s head and face to remove the caul, and then presented to the mother as an heirloom. In early European folklore, a caul carried good fortune to the bearer. (Additional research into some of the renown literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries would reveal its place as a talisman of value.)

Our Progeny Reveals Who We Were

 

 

 

 

 

 

Words of Wisdom: Our Progeny Reveals Who We Were

1. Better a dry morsel with quietness within than a house full of sacrifices with strife. 2. A servant who acts wisely shall rule over a son who causes shame and shall have part of the inheritance among the brothers. 3. A crucible (refining pot) is for silver, and the furnace (smelter) for gold, but the Lord tests hearts. 4. A wicked person (evildoer) gives heed to wicked (malicious) lips, and a liar (falsehood) gives an ear to a destructive tongue. 5. Whosoever mocks the poor taunts (rebukes) his Maker, and whosoever rejoices over calamities shall not go unpunished. 6. Children’s children are the crown of the elderly, and the glory (pride) of children are their fathers. Proverbs 17:1-6

If truth be told, our progeny (offspring) reflect who we were as parents. Children begin life as an empty sponge eager to sop up what they see and hear. Every child always looks to their parents as the guide for their life, even when the parent displays questionable behavior.

Sadly, this truth is easier to understand from the perspective of grandparenthood. The lasting impact of parents on their offspring is hard to grasp in the midst of raising our children. But, oh my, a grandparent’s perspective on this generational phenomenon is entirely different. So, whenever an elderly family member or close friend comes up and says, “You’re the spitting image of your father (or mother),” they may be referring to more than just appearance. Mannerisms, habits, and attitudes are learned and ingrained as children embody what they see and hear during their formative youth.

In simple terms: How parents choose to behave in front of their children matters. And, it is a choice. Every generation has the innate ability to alter their behavior and attitude as they mature. However, for many of us, the decision is not apparent until our children begin to exhibit traits that upset us. But, it is not until we recognize that our children are merely reflecting the mannerisms, habits, and attitudes we portrayed before them.

I wonder, does God allow us to catch a clear picture of our children’s likeness to stir within us a desire to change our destructive or malicious ways and attitudes? I believe, we all instinctively want to become a positive role model for our children? And we all pray in our hearts that our children will choose to behave rightly and not copy our faults.

Not only does God test our hearts, so do our children. God tests us to reveal our most significant needs of change. However, our children test our hearts to understand how they should behave and respond to others in this world. And it’s a fact: A wicked child will rejoice and take pride in being like his wicked father if that is all he sees from his father.

Grandparents have a decisive role to play in this cycle and afford a unique position and résumé of experience to identify their children in their grandchildren. So when, as parents, we get annoyed at our parents for seemingly butting in and giving us advice, understand they do it out of love, and often are trying to fix what they may have mistakenly left undone or unsaid when they reared the parent.

Let’s face it; God is our Maker. And, he wonderfully created each of us for his glory and purposes, but that does not mean we always may have done it right. God is also the author of “change.” We can choose to be transformed by God into what he intended from our birth. God likewise uses the gift of family to nurture the transformation process. Do not be angry when family members come to you and identify what they may see in us that may require change for the sake of our children or our children’s children. They are usually speaking out of the love of family! Our progeny reveals how we allowed God to transform us into his child.

Take time to scrutinize your children. See if you find yourself looking back. Does that produce a grin or a grimace? Is what you see pleasing to your heavenly Father? If so, your children should affirm that blessing through their actions and attitudes.

Coach
www.coachbrown.org

If you’d enjoy a Southern novel about small-town life dealing with the challenges and threats of 21st Century life, please visit my author page, T. M. Brown.

Humility Seeks Sanctuary

Walls made by man serve the needs of man, not God.

 

Humility Seeks Sanctuary

The one who is truly lazy in his work is a brother to a vandal. The name of the Lord is a strong tower (sanctuary); the righteous run to it and are protected. A rich man’s wealth is his fortified city; in his imagination, it is like a high wall. Before his downfall a man’s heart is proud, but before honor comes humility. The one who gives an answer before he listens – this is foolishness and disgrace for him. A man’s spirit can endure sickness, but who can survive a broken spirit? Prov 18:9-14 (HCSB)

Whether at school, at work, the community, or in the church, there are people we meet almost every day who are in the wall building business. You might even be in that same enterprise. Our insecurities about life, and about whom we believe we are, demand us to protect ourselves by establishing walls to keep others out. But, why would we want to build barriers and walls to exclude and divide? The wisdom of God’s Word indeed reveals there are walls created out of insecurity, and then there are the walls offering genuine security that humility provides.

The insecure person constructs impregnable barriers to isolate themselves from others to prevent others from ever knowing the truth about some shadowy aspect of their lives. These ever-growing walls are meant to keep others at a safe distance. Always far enough, so they never focus on the insecurities and fears of the person cowering behind the walls built ever higher and broader throughout their lifetime. However, the walls are just an illusion, preventing the person cowering behind the walls from ever seeing that their fears isolate them from ever establishing genuine relationships. They have severed themselves from real friendships and love for one another as God had intended. Their pride justifies their insecurity; they exist in a relationship of one – their “self.” What a pathetic, lonely existence we opt to endure when our fears rule over us.

The truly humble person has a high tower that they can run into, but the walls of this refuge are of God’s design. This secure place is a lofty refuge, a sanctuary from the tough times in life, but it is never intended to keep you there. It is where a humble heart seeks rest and restoration before confidently re-engaging life with its many relationship demands. God’s sanctuary also does not isolate nor exclude others from entering when they likewise require God’s peace and mercy. The Lord’s high tower helps all to see their proper place in life and re-focuses them on what is most important, which is not your-“self.” Lasting relationships are encouraged in this safe-place so that you can live confidently in the real world. It is a place where fears are relieved through the love found shared by others because where love thrives, fear cannot. The only price for entry into God’s sanctuary is our “self”! Humility is the currency God offers to pay the price for peace.

Decide for yourself, which leads to genuine life, and which locks you out from genuine life. Seek God’s will, ways, and wisdom and the answer may become clear.

Coach

Whoever tries to make his life secure will lose it, and whoever loses his life will preserve it. I tell you, on that night two will be in one bed: one will be taken, and the other will be left. Two women will be grinding grain together: one will be taken, and the other left. [Two will be in a field: one will be taken, and the other will be left.] Luke 17:33-36 (HCSB)

Have them make a sanctuary for me, and I will dwell among them. Exodus 25:8