Only Takes One Bad Apple

Can you identify the bad apple among the good? Why should you care?
Can you identify the bad apple among the good? Why should you care?

Only Takes One Bad Apple

Dead flies make a perfumer’s oil ferment and stink; so a little folly outweighs wisdom and honor. A wise man’s heart [goes] to the right, but a fool’s heart to the left. Even when the fool walks along the road, his heart lacks sense, and he shows everyone he is a fool. If the ruler’s anger rises against you, don’t leave your place, for calmness puts great offenses to rest. Eccl 10:1-4 (HCSB)

When shopping in a farmer’s market for a bushel of apples, it is hard to realize at first glance if the bushel you are looking at contains a bad apple that could infect the others. If you do not take the time to inspect all the apples, there is the chance one bad apple could become a host of bad apples in no time.

The same is true in a group of people – it only takes one ‘bad apple’ to harm others. The ‘bad apple’ can disguise himself and blend in among the others, but sooner or later he begins to unveil his miscreant nature.

Because it is the natural instinct within mankind to follow (guess that’s why we are identified so often as sheep), there resides in our nature a constant risk of choosing the wrong leader to follow. However, time unmasks the folly of the fool, and those who have blindly followed him begin to wake up to their precarious state unless they change leadership and dismiss the fool’s folly for others to see.

So choose wisely the leaders you choose to follow. Even if you discover the error of the choice at some later time, a price will be paid for the time you followed the fool. Just a short exposure to the ‘bad apple’ puts a ‘good apple’ at risk.

What can we do? When you are at the farmer’s market selecting apples, reminders of past experiences discovering ‘bad apples’ will guide you to root out even one bad apple from the bushel of apples you decide to bring home.

The same is true in life. The closer we are to God’s will, ways, and wisdom, the more likely we are to recognize the ‘bad apples’ who are opposed to following anyone else’s way of life except their own, their own selfish folly. Whenever anyone claims to be a leader with all the answers: RUN!

We may strive to become wiser and more mature, but we will never be fully wise or fully mature. Those who believe they are all-wise and mature become their own god. The wise man realizes the wiser we become, the more dependent we become to pursuing God and following him alone. When we reach that point in our life, God helps us identify the ‘bad apples’ to avoid their folly.

How careful are you about sorting out the “bad apples’ from the ‘good apples’?

Coach

Words of Wisdom #249-33EC