Having the Right People in the Right Positions

ecclesiastes10_18

Having the Right People in the Right Positions

Woe to you, land, when your king is a household servant, and your princes feast in the morning. Blessed are you, land, when your king is a son of nobles and your princes feast at the proper time – for strength and not for drunkenness. Because of laziness the roof caves in, and because of negligent hands the house leaks. A feast is prepared for laughter and wine makes life happy, and money is the answer to everything. Do not curse the king even in your thoughts, and do not curse a rich person even in your bedroom, for a bird of the sky may carry the message, and a winged creature may report the matter. Eccl 10:16-20 (HCSB)

Certainly, the common person relates to others who are most like them, but is that a good thing when selecting our leaders to govern over us? Do we want the best and most qualified, or do we want to relate with the people we have placed into office? Well, consider this: if you have a need for life-saving surgery, do you want a surgeon who is chosen out of your pool of friends or those most like you, or would you seek the most qualified surgeon? Governors and Presidents are not meant to be our best friends, but the most ideal person to keep us secure and maintain stability for our life.

The Social Contract theory of man says that we are willing to give up certain personal natural liberties to protect our primary interests of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of property” which translates to Happiness. In that willingness to submit to a government to govern over us, we also recognize that the best government is the one that governs the least while securing our liberties the best. That balance requires competence, and we ourselves are not properly experienced and trained to govern efficiently and effectively – nor are those in our circle of friends or family. So in the end, do not choose people for positions in government because we like them the most or can relate to them best, but simply will I feel more secure with truly competent and prepared people serving our needs if placed into positions of government.

As we look ahead to a future of hope and prosperity, we need to be reminded that our government is allowed to govern only by the consent of the governed – that is the constitutional principle of popular sovereignty. Before we bad mouth those in office lets be reminded that it is the people that have authorized those in office to govern. If there is any bad mouthing, it is towards the general population for deciding to place the people in office that are there. We the people have the final say – but choose wisely at the next opportunity to support or replace those in government.

From God’s perspective, He exercises His divine sovereignty through the hearts of men and women. I pray that recognize that God’s will, God’s ways, and God’s wisdom according to God’s Word will be ideally revealed when His people seek His guidance and approval for the selection of the servant-leaders who run our government. So when the roof seems as if it is caving in, and there are leaking breeches, we only can blame ourselves for not seeking God’s ideal servants but those we feel most comfortable with.

Coach

Fleeting Legacy of Leadership

Can you recall the names of these most honored presidents?
Can you recall the names of these most honored presidents?

Fleeting Legacy of Leadership

Better is a poor but wise youth than an old but foolish king who no longer pays attention to warnings. For he came from prison to be king, even though he was born poor in his kingdom. I saw all the living who move about under the sun follow a second youth who succeeds him. There is no limit to all the  people who were before them, yet those who come later will not rejoice in him. This too is futile and a pursuit of the wind. Eccl 4:13-16 (HCSB)

Which king does this passage focus on? Is it Solomon? I don’t think so, unless he is seen as the second youth. Was David, Solomon’s father, the king that rose from prison. An argument could be raised to that affect because of King Saul’s relentless pursuit of David. Whomever is pictured, this passage ponders how history will regard them after they are long gone.

There is little difference between kings of ancient realms and heads of state today. In our country, every four or eight years the mantle of leadership gets passed on to the next president. As soon as the former steps down we immediately begin to compare their term in office with the accomplishments and disappointments of other past presidents, and in short order with the new president as he (and someday, she) grasps the reins and directs the course of our country.

Initially, a rosy glow follows each past president for a period after they leave office, and it burns once again upon their passing for a spell. However, in time, the legacy of all our presidents winds up in volumes of books crowded amongst the previous volumes written about all the other past presidents, comparing the accomplishments and failures of each president. All written through the bias of time and the fickleness of ever-changing popular opinion.

It is interesting though, as important as their time in office, we relish as much curiosity upon their backgrounds, and how their upbringing and early struggles shaped their leadership legacy. We tend to connect best to the rare leader who arrives onto the national scene from common roots similar to our own. In recent history it has been harder and harder to find that kind of presidential candidate, but there have been several notables since World War II: Harry Truman, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Each of these rose from ordinary beginnings in poor or ordinary family situations. Clinton and Obama were raised in broken homes, which marked their personalities. People relate to common humble beginnings and the climbing of the ladder of leadership through a lifetime marked by hard work and uncanny grit to fulfill their destiny.

However, time takes its toll. Interest in their humble beginnings fades. History redacts our memories and only highlights remain as footnotes in the history books. In time, like the kings of ancient days, little more than another presidential bust or portrait remains identifying the growing line of former presidents, but most people will fail to even recall many of their names.

Whether from rich, ordinary or poor family backgrounds – God calls men and women to rise up as leaders for his greater purposes, and he holds each accountable for their time under the sun. Nothing has changed in all the millennium of kingdoms, nations and governments instituted by mankind. Monarchs, oligarchies, and presidents, whether elected or appointed, lead under God’s approval and the favor of the people they serve. From time to time as Thomas Jefferson pointed out in our nation’s Declaration of Independence, we remind ourselves that governments receives its authority to govern from those they govern. It is a cherished right whereby the value is derived by each of us relinquishing a portion of our freedom to protect our rights to pursue life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

We may memorialize past presidents and write about them in history books, but only the current president can make a difference in the lives of the people. The only constant we can depend upon is God’s influence upon each leader after the voice of the people reveal his will. May we trust in God as the next president finds his or her place to guide our country.

Coach

Words of Wisdom #228-12EC